Author: ISARN

Call for Papers for Edited Volume: Marxism and Migration

Deadline: February 1, 2020
Editors: Genevieve Ritchie, Sara Carpenter, and Shahrzad Mojab
Contact Information: marxism.and.migration [at] gmail.com

The present conditions of transnational migration are nothing short of alarming. Best described as a kind of social expulsion, these conditions range from migrant caravans and detained unaccompanied children in the United States to the thousands of migrant deaths at sea to the razing of self-organized refugee camps in Greece and to the massive internal and inter-regional dispersal of populations. At the very same time, technology firms are using refugee camps as testing grounds and migrants are targeted by the financial industry as an ideal investment and workforce. The chaos of migration stretches globally yet differentially impacts countless communities. Migrants are simultaneously described as a dangerous threat, victims of state violence, culturally backward, and resilient workers, while activists talk of undoing border imperialism, decolonizing settler societies, or opening borders. We, therefore, find reason to pose the following questions: What are the historical continuities linking colonial dispossession to the displacements and dispossessions internal to the imperialist stage of capitalism? To what extent do the conditions propelling migration cohere with, and even support, the state practices of managing class interests through the threat of crisis? Lastly, to what extent has the ostensible crisis of migration assisted with the criminalization of activists resisting state violence? Marxism and Migration seeks to theorize these chaotic and uneven conditions by centering the global relations of class struggle.

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Call to Boycott Turkish Government Sponsored Academic and Cultural Institutions

Activists and academics are signing on to a call to boycott academic and cultural institutions sponsored by the Turkish government in the wake if the latter’s Syrian incursion:

We call on academics, artists and intellectuals around the world to oppose the Turkish invasion of northeastern Syria by boycotting Turkish government sponsored academic, artistic and musical events taking place inside and outside of Turkey.

Read more on the campaign website.

Call for Papers: Solidarity and Transnational Cultural Forms

Deadline: August 30 ,2019
Coordinators: Jessica Stites Mor (University of British Columbia), Anna Bernard (King’s College, London), and Anthony Alessandrini (City University of New York)

Transnational solidarity is envisioned as a reciprocal relationship between geographically distant actors based on shared political commitments. Given that this kind of transnational work involves great distances and language divides, the potential for miscommunication and misrepresentation is enormous. The visibility and appeal of movements like the Arab Spring uprisings, Occupy Wall Street, the indignados, Palestinian and Kurdish national struggles, and open borders activism has brought increasing public pressure on those who study and theorize this form of activism to broaden their ability to understand better what activists do and why. On the ground, the frustration of activists when facing failures within movements creates a need for rigorous attention to cultural forms and movements from multiple disciplinary perspectives.

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Call for papers: Solidarity in Translation

Deadline: September 23rd, 2019
Organizer: Anthony Alessandrini
Co-Organizer: Julie-Françoise Tolliver

In “Five Theses on the Common,” Gigi Roggero writes that “the common is always organized in translation.” This seminar begins from a related suggestion: that it might be possible to say that solidarity is always organized in translation.

This could mean a number of things. Most simply, forms of international/translocal solidarity almost inevitably involve the use of literal translations. At a different level, we might ask whether “translation” can be useful for thinking about the role played by literary and cultural production in political struggle—for example, asking how writers and artists translate political struggles into the body of their cultural work, and in turn how political actors translate the forms of political imaginaries found in literary and artistic works into their praxis. At the furthest end of the spectrum, given the global rise of right-wing populism and the resurgence of fascistic nationalist movements (including white supremacist movements), we might propose that today, all attempts to translate across borders and boundaries might be reimagined as forms of solidarity.

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